Biblical Politics

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This is a post I’ve been somewhat reluctant to write, but with the inauguration just a few hours away and many articles, letters, and sermons by people I respect a great deal but completely disagree with to spur me on, I feel that it’s time for me to write something that may make me unpopular with many of the people who visit here. Nonetheless, I feel these things need to be said and especially need to be heard in the Christian camp.

Conservative Christians everywhere feel that our Country has been struck a major blow in this years election. To the truthful, I didn’t feel comfortable with either candidate and I didn’t vote. My husband would say that this means I have no right to complain about who won. Personally, I don’t think that any of us have the right to complain about who won.

I am so very sick at heart when I read all the articles and hear all the sermons prophesying doom over our country because of Barak Obama’s election. Many seem to find immense satisfaction in the prospect of God’s judgement on America. Just as Absalom stole the heart of the nation by the words that he spoke against David, so do many of our church leaders (perhaps unintentionally) incite the hearts of their congregations against their new leaders.

“They are presumptuous, self-willed. They are not afraid to speak evil of leaders, whereas angels, who are greater in power and might, do not bring a reviling accusation against them before the Lord” (2 Peter 2:10,11).

If we are truly concerned over the ability of our new leaders to take this country in a Godly direction, then it is our God-given right and responsibility to use the power that God has given us to pray for them. In 1 Timothy 2:1-4 we are commanded to both thank God for our leaders, and to pray for them. Derek Prince, in his book Shaping History Through Prayer and Fasting, writes: “Why do the majority of Christians have no assurance of good government? There can only be two reasons: either they do not pray at all for good government, or they pray for good government but without the knowledge that it is God’s will” (1).

“Ask of me and I will surely give you the nations…” (Psalm 2:8).

“For this is good and acceptable in the sight of God our Savior; who desires all men to be saved, and to come unto the knowledge of the truth” (1 Timothy 2:3-4).

I do not deny that many pastors and prophets claim to have received words from God predicting the doom of our Nation due to this years election results. Whether or not these “prophetic” words are from God is not my main concern. What bothers me is the lack of hope. Does God not tell us that “the prayer of the righteous man availeth much?” Do we not have example after example of God’s mercy in the face of destruction, brought about by the “prayers of the righteous?” We as believers have more authority in our words and prayers to affect a change in this country than any Government official. Our attitude should be that of Jeremiah, not of Job. As Cindy Jacobs writes:

“Jeremiah was one of the greatest intercessors in the Bible and he prayed incessantly for Israel. But at one point God told Jeremiah to stop praying for Israel because He was going to judge it. What was Jeremiah’s response? He prayed for God’s mercy for His people. Ten chapters later Jeremiah was still praying for mercy and God’s anger was averted. We as intercessors should stand before God when we receive a word of doom and gloom and pray from Habakkuk 3:2: O God, in judgement, remember mercy” (2).

Our attitude should be that of the Prophet Daniel, who was called to interpret a dream prophesying the destruction of one of the most ungodly rulers of Israel’s history, yet cried out in grief: “I pray that this is not for you but for another!” As Bill Johnson writes: “[Daniel’s] devotion was not based on the character of his king. It was based on the character of the One who assigned him the position of service” (3). Nebuchadnezzar’s final recorded words are those of praise toward the God of Israel. Daniel’s loyalty to his king led to one of the greatest conversions of all time.

I¬†pray to God that every Christian who is concerned over Barak Obama’s presidency would rise up and take their place as children of the Most High to stand in the gap on behalf of our President and our Nation. There is no government official in the world who can take this country in a direction that believers themselves do not allow it to go in. We can either use our God-given power to bring about the changes we feel are necessary, or we can continue to speak against our government and use the power God has given us on behalf of the enemy (Proverbs 12:24, 18:21).

“You shall not revile the gods, nor curse the ruler of your people” (Exodus 22:28).

In the name of Jesus, please let us stop tearing this country down with our own mouths and begin building it up with our prayers. Can we really make a difference?

YES WE CAN!

1.) Derek Prince, Shaping History Through Prayer and Fasting, pg 55

2.) Cindy Jacobs, Possessing the Gates of the Enemy, Chosen Books, 2006, pg 133

3.) Bill Johnson, When Heave Invades Earth, Destiny Image Publications, 2003, p170

Related Posts:

Inviting God Into America

How Will WE Effect the Next Four Years?

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4 Responses to Biblical Politics

  1. Mrs. Parunak says:

    So often I think that we develop a lot of contempt for our leaders specifically because we do vote for them. We debate their strengths and weaknesses in the public forum. We make our choices and cast our votes, and then we feel either excited or depressed about who “won.” But we forget that it is the Lord who sets up kings (and presidents), and He calls us to honor and respect His choice. Never mind who we, in our finite, human wisdom thought should be in power.

    • Rina says:

      Mrs. P, I’m far from perfect in this area myself… It’s difficult to keep from talking about our leaders weaknesses, and it’s something the Lord has really been putting on my heart for the past year or so. As you said, we MUST remember that it is God who sets up our leaders, and it’s our God-given resonsibility to pray on their behalf.

  2. EllaJac says:

    Rina, Thank you for commenting and visiting my blog! I posted the Dutch Sheets’ stuff out of interest and thoughtfulness; not because I’ve ‘hitched my wagon to his.’ I completely agree that our duty now is to pray, pray pray for our country and it’s leaders. I’ve actually meant to post another tidbit I got through email a week or two ago, and am doing that directly. Blessings to you.

    • Rina says:

      EllaJac, Thanks for clarifying… I didn’t get the impression that you had “hitched your wagon to his,” I just wanted to send the link to you since your post inspired mine. :) I’ll be looking forward to reading your new post on this touchy subject!

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